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Restoration of Gun Rights

If you were convicted of a crime, you may have lost your rights to possess a firearm. Under certain circumstances, depending on your state, you may be eligible to restore your gun rights. RecordGone.com specializes in post-conviction relief and can help restore firearm rights.


How Can RecordGone.com Help me Restore my Firearm Rights?

If you have been denied the right to purchase of a firearm because of a violent or domestic violence conviction and you would like to speak with an attorney about the possibility of challenging the denial or taking legal action to have the federal prohibition removed from you, please call (877-573-7273 ext 1) and ask for a phone consultation with Attorney Mathew Higbee— a 20 minute consultation costs $100.

RecordGone.com specializes in post-conviction relief, including restoring firearm rights, and depending on the nature of your conviction, can petition the courts to restore your gun rights. RecordGone.com currently offers firearm rights restoration services nationwide.

Nationwide Firearm Rights Services
State-Specific Firearm Rights Services

Domestic Violence and Gun Rights Restoration

Generally, felony offenses and certain violent offenses may result in the loss of gun rights and the right to restore 2nd amendment rights. However, certain domestic violence misdemeanor convictions may result in the loss of firearm rights due to the Lautenberg Amendment.

The Lautenberg Amendment

The Lautenberg Amendment is an amendment to the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 1997 enacted in 1996. The Lautenberg Amendment bans the possession of firearms or ammunition by those convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence. It is also illegal to sell or give a firearm to a person who has had their gun rights restricted by the Lautenberg Amendment.

The Lautenberg Amendment's definition of domestic violence is defined within the amendment, not the laws of the state where the offense occured. The Lautenberg Amendment's definition of domestic violence is more narrow than what the state considers domestic violence. If you do not meet the federal governments definition of domestic violence, you may still apply to have your gun rights reinstated. The Lautenberg's definition of domestic violence is listed below.

"Has, as an element, the use or attempted use of physical force, or the threatened use of a deadly weapon, committed by a current or former spouse, parent, or guardian of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabiting with or has cohabited with the victim as a spouse, parent, or guardian, or by a person similarly situated to a spouse, parent, or guardian of the victim."

Client Testimonials

"Thank you very much for all of your help. You have been just wonderful and I appreciate everything that you have done for me during this process."
- Al R.
"I am quite confident with a lesser attorney the judge would have denied it, although my attorney stood her ground and ultimately got the judge (and the prosecutor) to change his mind and agree to vacate."
- Tyler A.