Jeffrey B. JacksonAttorney

  • Year joined firm: 2013
  • Law School: Indiana University, Rocket H. McKinney School of Law
  • Bachelors and Masters: Indiana University, Bloomington
  • State Born: Indiana

Jeffrey B. Jackson, Esq., is a member in good standing of the Indiana State Bar (Attorney No. 19735-52), and is licensed to practice law in all Indiana federal and state courts, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Bankruptcy Appellate Panel of the Ninth Circuit. He has focused his practice on bankruptcy, criminal law, family law, governmental law and civil litigation. He has spoken on bankruptcy law topics for the Indiana State Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Solo and Small Firm Section, and is a contributor to the blog Los Angeles Bankruptcy Monitor. He is also a former Public Defender for both adult and juvenile cases for courts in Southern Indiana.

Jeff is a former Chairman of the General Practice, Solo and Small Firm Section of the Indiana State Bar Association; former Chairman of the Casemaker Improvement Committee of the Indiana State Bar Association; former Secretary of the Bankruptcy and Creditor’s Rights Section of Indiana State Bar Association; and former President of the Bartholomew County (Indiana) Bar Association. He is a member of the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys, the American Bankruptcy Institute, and the Indiana State Bar Association, and a former member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree and Master’s Degree in Public Affairs (MPA) from Indiana University-Bloomington, and his law degree from the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law at Indianapolis, and is a graduate of the National Institute of Trial Advocacy.

Favorite Part of the Job

You cannot be an attorney without enjoying people; each person is different, as are their legal issues. Getting to know each person and their problems, as helping them to solve them, is why I became a lawyer.

Advice to Clients

There is no blanket approach to the practice of law - each client has their own issues, concerns, and questions. An attorney is there to listen as much as he or she is there to advocate; be direct, be forthcoming and be honest and it makes it that much easier to get to to the solution of the issues involved. Also, exercise patience - the law is slow and tedious, and it may take longer than you want to get your case resolved. A judge once admonished one of my clients whom, against my advice, demanded a decision on a particular issue at that moment. The judge looked at him and said “Sir, do you REALLY want me to decide right now? You may not like the answer”. The client immediately came to the conclusion that it might be better to wait to let the judge think about it.

Interesting Facts